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Free the Robots - Free the Robots EP



Free the Robots The Prototype
Free the Robots - Free the Robots EP
(CD/12") Elsewhere Studios, 2006-11

Free the Robots Free The Robots EP
Free the Robots - Free the Robots EP
(CD/12") Elsewhere Studios, 2006-11

CD Tracklisting:
01. Listen To The Future 3:22
02. Diary 3:58
03. Jazzhole 3:44
04. Yoga Fire 2:56
05. Lonely Traveler 4:19
06. Session Two 4:34

12" Tracklisting:
A1. Listen to the Future
A2. Diary
A3. Jazzhole
B1. Yoga Fire
B2. Lonely Traveler
B3. Session Two

Links:
myspace.com/freetherobots
robotfreedom.blogspot.com
thisisthecrosby.blogspot.com
elsewherestudios.com
myspace.com/fromelsewhere

Info :
New one from these eclectic Cali associates, friends of Obey who some of you might know from their appearance on the Jazz & Milk breaks comp last year. There's a fine line with this kinda stuff: of course, nobody wants to hear a band stuck in the same style on every tune, but you also have to be wary of "too many cooks spoiling the broth." Free The Robots tread on that line like some tightrope performers, and they manage to pull off the trick on every track here, balancing breakbeats, psychedelia, hip hop and electronic elements like it's nothin'. From the smoked-out, spattering, Speak-N-Spell groove of "Listen To The Future" to the jazzy "Session Two", these guys show that they can even weave dialogue and non-traditional lyrics into their music. The title alone on "Yoga Fire" had us Street Fighter nerds trippin', but the music (sounds like a Bollywood breakbeat version of "Apache") ain't too shabby either. Lastly, check the bouncy, swingin' "Jazzhole", and if you still aren't convinced, I guess this isn't your cuppa joe.

"Now on digital, the debut release from the eclectic Cali producer Free The Robots. If you are not familiar, he produces in the kitchen sink style, balancing breakbeats, psychedelia, hip hop and electronic elements like it's nothin. People have compared him to The Avalanches and Kid Koala, but he's more mellow than that. His tracks have a way of coming together, the odd parts maturing into a highly listenable bouillabaisse. Check out the diversity, from the smoked-out, spattering, Speak-N-Spell groove of "Listen To The Future," to the jazzy "Session Two," he shows that he can even weave dialogue with non-traditional lyrics into their music. The title alone on "Yoga Fire" had us Street Fighter nerds trippin', but the music (sounds like a Bollywood breakbeat version of "Apache") ain't too shabby either. Lastly, check the bouncy, swingin' "Jazzhole," and if you still aren't convinced, I guess this isn't your cuppa joe." - reviewed by Chris Lemon-Red 10/15/2007 on turntablelab.com

"Santa Ana DJ/producer Chris Alfaro probably knows more about music than you do. He has applied his advanced knowledge of jazz, funk, rock, hip-hop and electronic music to his Free the Robots solo project, and the diligent studying and crate-digging have paid serious dividends. Call him an old-school avant-gardist. Free the Robots creates instrumental hip-hop based on obscure samples that are ingeniously spliced and juxtaposed for maximum friction and frisson. Check out the self-titled EP on Elsewhere Studios for proof. The first track is called "Listen to the Future," and it's not an idle boast. These tracks swing and funk and bliss out and aren't afraid to wave their prog or Bollywood or pre-bop-jazz freak flags." - OC Weekly

"If you are one of those people who love everything about music -- experimental, jazz, electronica, downtempo, bossanova, hip hop, soul, rock, psychedelic and more -- Free the Robots may just be your new favorite indie band. Few bands do panoramic electronic soundscapes as these guys do, scratched with ethereal voices and eerie noises. More ordinary instruments are included, but add to the strange atmosphere rather than grounding it -- razor-sharp percussion, mellow organ, and subtle, swelling strings. Their sound is difficult to define, experimental jazz/hip hop smoothed with techno groves that would make you think of Aphex Twin or Kraftwork, then covered with a thin membrane of Pink Floyd. My favorite song was Moonchild Revisited, a mellow, dreamy, surreal and subliminal offering accompanied by vocals that reminded me strongly of Thom Yorke. The classic jazz piano in JazzHOLE Revisited had me tapping my feet and kept conjuring images of 1940's gangsters in bright yellow zoot suits. I played Free the Robots for other members of the iMP staff. Some loved it. Some didn't get it. But there's one undeniable thing -- these chilly, eerie songs are marvelously complex. In a musical world where anything that has a guitar can be called "rock," it's difficult to find music that is really creative. It's even harder to find a band that is willing to take risks, and expand their art. But those things can be found in Free the Robots. Whether listeners think it's a wild success or a pretentious failure, it has to be admitted that it takes guts to try out something this different." - iMP

"A little jazz, a little classical, and a little old school hip-hop gives you Free the Robots, perhaps one of the most unique and promising sounds I’ve heard in a while. Comrades by wordpress, I hope to see a lot more of these guys in the future. The EP starts off with the aptly named track, Listen to the Future. Breaking in with some heavy downbeats and everyone’s lovable microsoft sam, this track sets you up for a well mixed trip into some classic hip-hop voice-over with the synth back-up and some jazzy piano main flow. It doesn’t sound so good on paper, but Free the Robots pull it off with a unique style that is extremely well done. The follow-up Diary is not as impressive at first glance, starting off with an edited monotone voice juxtaposed against a hip-hop overlay and unexciting beats. The song pulls itself up a notch when it falls into the jazzy bass and piano pieces, even going so far as some recognizable classical pieces. Free the Robots strives on these odd comparisons, and I am still trying to figure out how they make it work so well. Jazzhole is the song that makes the EP. Upbeat and somewhat nostalgic jazz runs through the whole song and bringing in old dance beats for the backbone. The song doesn’t alter this formula too much, but it doesn’t need to, as it stands alone as a unique piece that only hints at what Free the Robots may do in the future. I’m crossing my fingers. The rest of the Ep is solid, if not as exciting. Yoga Fire tries to pull in older jazz with some hard synth piano and it doesn’t work very well. The beats just don’t flow well as they chop and cut them in between sections. Experience will fix errors like this, as Yoga Fire is a really interesting piece; it just feels unpolished. Lonely Traveler is a more downtempo song with some scratches thrown in over the soft melodies. I like the idea, but again, it feels as if it didn’t come out as intended and was mashed together in perhaps an over explosion of creativity. I really enjoy the opening to Session Two and the back beat but the song never really goes anywhere, creating a Lemon Jellyish ambient song, which isn’t a horrible thing but it doesn’t fit in with the rest of the album too well. Overall, I’m really excited to see where this group will go. The EP shows some real promise for something new in the electronic genre, and it breaks out of the old hip-hop remix feel of scratches only. We have the funk based electronica, now onto the jazz. Final Grade: A- (Check it out, you’ll like it)" - thedigitalgadfly.com
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