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Jeremiah Jae - Rappayamatantra EP - out on Brainfeeder



Jeremiah Jae Rappayamatantra
Jeremiah Jae - Rappayamatantra EP
(Download single) Brainfeeder BFDNL017, 2011-03-21

"...Rappayamatantra EP is a bridge between the Dxnce EP, and my future LP release entitled Raw Money Raps. Rappayamatantra, as a theme, came to me while I was reading Be Here Now, a book written By Ram Dass. It totally reaffirmed for me that everyone possess a divine energy, and through certain practices and principles, anyone can realize and fulfill their own spiritual and creative potential. As a rapper, one challenge that can disrupt that true being, can be to remain relevant and even trendy so that one can be popular and make money. With this record I didn't want to think too much about commercial appeal or trends, rather the personal struggle to remain honest and balanced for anyone, be them a rapper, a teacher, or a friend. This record is intended to be a direct communication for the humans out there, if you dress fly, or not. Even if you like to play computer games or meditate in the mornings. Be empowered and enlightened through your own light the body possesses, and bump this EP in the whip! Please Cop! Hotep." Jeremiah Jae

Jeremiah Jae Rappayamatantra
Jeremiah Jae - Rappayamatantra EP
(Download single) Brainfeeder BFDNL017, 2011-03-21

Tracklisting :
01. The Dirty Collector Pt. 1
02. Kings Bop
03. Guns Go Off (Remix)
04. $easons
05. Raw Tape$
06. Vertical Pupils
07. Stones Passage
08. Glitter Kit

Links :
jeremiahjaer.wordpress.com
soundcloud.com/jeremiahjae
twitter.com/matthewdavid
youtube.com/user/JEREMIAHRR
www.myspace.com/yellowmask
brainfeedersite.com
soundcloud.com/brainfeeder
twitter.com/Brainfeeder
vimeo.com/channels/brainfeeder
facebook.com/pages/BRAINFEEDER/117839439630

Press Release :
"Some rappers be killing my mood. I'll listen to shit on the radio or hear a 'hot' new rap album from some dude, and it's like my spirit curls up. The beats may be dope, and the style, but I'm not entirely into the motives or messages of these guys. It's defiantly not 'hate' against any new or old artist that have gained such a high commercial popularity, nor am I directing my energy to compete with such musical acts, I just build my music from a different place spiritually.

Growing up, I was going back and forth from the north side of Chicago, going to art school, to the south side where gang members are young entrepreneurs and positive or healthy choices are met with anger and a deep unending struggle. Yet, being around certain people and having examples such as my father (a jazz composer, pianist, and vegan for over 10 years), exposed me to more holistic paths in life which helped open my mind, body, and spirit to discovering ways of expressing myself.

Rappayamatantra EP is a bridge between the Dxnce EP, and my future LP release entitled Raw Money Raps. Rappayamatantra, as a theme, came to me while I was reading "Be Here Now", a book written By Ram Dass. It totally reaffirmed for me that everyone possess a divine energy, and through certain practices and principles, anyone can realize and fulfill their own spiritual and creative potential. As a rapper, one challenge that can disrupt that true being, can be to remain relevant and even trendy so that one can be popular and make money.

With this record I didn't want to think too much about commercial appeal or trends, rather the personal struggle to remain honest and balanced for anyone, be them a rapper, a teacher, or a friend. This record is intended to be a direct communication for the humans out there, if you dress fly, or not. Even if you like to play computer games or meditate in the mornings. Be empowered and enlightened through your own light the body possesses, and bump this EP in the whip! Please Cop! Hotep."
Jeremiah Jae

"When I first heard Jae's 'Dxnce' I laughed a little, because I felt like I had found one of the chosen. A sound I've come to know through my own lineage. The sound of the Seeker. He's one of those artists on a mission for truth, understanding worlds and seeing beyond space and time through music. Jeremiah is one of the most important NEW voices of our ancestry. I believe in this man and will go along with him and whatever the hell he's seeking on this journey." - Flying Lotus



Biography :
From Chicago Weekly...

Looking at Jeremiah Jae's "studio," a tiny room in his Bridgeport apartment, one is struck by the relative scarcity of recent technology on the room's low coffee tables. There's a small synth and a tape deck that looked like it might've been copped from Walgreen's sometime in the mid-'90s. A guitar rests in the corner, and there's a rusty old pocket cornet that will need some fixing up before it'll play. The digs are humble, but it's from this studio that Jeremiah Jae has produced beats that have earned him—at the age of 21—a deal with Los Angeles-based Brainfeeder Records.

His mother sang gospel and his father was a musical director for Miles Davis during the late, jazz-fusion period of Davis's career. In high school, Jae listened not to hip-hop but to glam rock, and cites Placebo, a British alternative band, as a favorite. Groups like Souls of Mischief and Wu-Tang Clan introduced him to hip-hop, and at that point Jae began rhyming. Together with brothers Tre Smith and Aaron "Projeck" Butler, he founded a group called the Young Black Preachers, produced YBP's EP, and continued working on his own projects, while making his own videos and cover art. In 2007, Samiyam, an Ann Arbor-based producer, noticed Jae's "Lunch Special Part I" and passed it onto Flying Lotus, the founder of LA's Brainfeeder record label who had made himself known through his music for Adult Swim's characteristic program bumpers. A post on Jae's MySpace wall came first; a private message soon followed. Not long after, Jae was flown to LA to work with FlyLo and was signed to Brainfeeder; his first release, "Rappayamatantra," is scheduled to drop in early 2011.

From under a layer of gauzy, lo-fi production, Jae is able to conjure the off-kilter beats and ethereal voicings characteristic of a mature producer. A track like "Police Ball State Disco" might induce trances with its 7/8, world-music feel. On "Money Huggers," Jae samples the theme to "Shaft," but eschews extensive drum programming in favor of the original simple hi-hat slowed-down-a -few beats-per-minute. The result pays homage to wah-wah-driven funk, but the minimalism of the beat gives the track a more modern feel. The diversity of influences in Jae's work speaks not only to his appetite for various genres of music, characteristic of any producer worth his salt, but also to a personal history forged primarily outside of hip-hop. Jae's musical philosophy is drawn from many sources. He is the rare young emcee who channels jazz improvisation into delivering rhymes. "It's all about timing," he says. "Space is important. I try to do it like a trumpeter playing a solo."

When Jae brings social commentary into his work, the thoughtfulness with which he does it is unusual. "Rappers try to romanticize the hood," Jae says, so the task is to find a way to critique while staying true to one's own conception of one's home. On the FlyLo-produced anthem "Jackson Park," instead of outsized proclamations about his native South Side, Jae opts for understatement and a critical message about his home. The song, which opens, "Mr. Mayor don't care," isn't meant to describe an overtly political stance. "I didn't want to hate on anyone," Jae says. "It's just, there aren't a lot of good vibes on the South Side, you know? I'm not out to make political statements. I just want to stay rooted in what's going on around me."

All of this is, of course, in the service of a single goal, Jae says: "At the end of the day, I want to make music that's dope." An ability to manipulate synthesizer and drum tracks into dark, airy atmosphere; a voice that's all his own, understated despite his qyouth—it's all there, and it's landed him on the brink of fame. When asked if the sudden success has gone to his head or made him at least want to quit his day job at a Bridgeport café, he comes across as both confident and humble: "Until the day Jeremiah Jae has a billion hits, I'm not going to care."
Djouls

Djouls

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